Lebanese dating and marriage

After gaining independence from the French in 1943, Lebanon became known as the "Switzerland of the Middle East." However, its delicate political and demographic equilibrium was shattered in 1975 when civil war erupted.

England assumed control of what became Palestine and Jordan, and France took over what became Syria and Lebanon.

At this time, France divided Mount Lebanon from Syria and, adding the coastal area, created an entity called "The State of Greater Lebanon." In 1926 the Republics of Lebanon and Syria were created, but it was not until 1941 that each gained full independence, and the last French troops did not depart until 1946.

At the time of the first immigration wave to the West, Lebanon was not yet a sovereign nation; Because the Ottomans administered their subject peoples according to their religious affiliation, early immigrants from Greater Syria identified with their religious sect rather than any nationality.

A sense of national identity did not begin to form among the Greater Syrians until the 1920s, when Lebanon became a separate French protectorate.

The population of the country is made up of ethnic groups from every Middle Eastern country, which is reflective of Lebanon's long history. Both Muslims and Christians have many sectarian subdivisions, 17 in all.

Among the Muslim population, the Shi'a are the most numerous with about 35 percent, the Sunni number around 23 percent, and the Druze comprise 6 percent.

For 16 years, Lebanon was torn apart by fighting between Christians and Muslims.

Although a tentative peace agreement in 1991 ended the war, many problems remain.

The earliest immigrants from the Eastern Mediterranean were generally lumped together under the common rubric of Syrian-Lebanese, and it is consequently difficult to separate the number of ethnic Lebanese immigrants from ethnic Syrian immigrants.

Neither of these countries came into being as nation-states until the mid-twentieth century; thus records and statistics for both groups are generally combined for early immigration patterns.

After the Ottoman Empire gained general control of the area in 1516, Lebanon continued to maintain a feudal system of rule by local chieftains.

Tags: , ,