Dating violence training inces xx3gp

Researchers found that the rate of physical dating violence for a random sample of Canadian students who participated in the curriculum was significantly lower than the control group (9.8 percent versus 7.4 percent).Significance wasn’t maintained for those who had been dating in the previous year.An evaluation of Break the Cycle’s Ending Violence curriculum with a sample of predominately Latino teens from a large urban school district found that the youth demonstrated improved knowledge of the laws related to dating violence, less acceptance of female-on-male aggression, and increased perception of the likelihood and helpfulness of seeking assistance from various sources after they had completed the program.

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The combination also resulted in reduced incidences of sexual and physical dating violence by as much as 50 percent up to six months after the intervention.

The classroom-only intervention did not prove effective.

A few programs frame the issue using a feminist perspective, while others use a more skills-based and gender-neutral approach.

Teen dating violence prevention programs tend to focus on attitudes about violence, gender stereotyping, conflict management, and problem-solving skills.

Activities aimed at increasing awareness and dispelling myths about violence in relationships are often included in the curriculum.

The Safe Dates Project is an intervention that includes school activities (e.g., a theater production performed by peers, a curriculum of ten 45-minute sessions taught by health and physical education teachers, and a poster contest) and community activities (e.g., services for adolescents in abusive relationships and service provider training).

In addition to teaching relationship skills, prevention programs can focus on promoting protective factors—that is, characteristics of a teen’s environment that can support healthy development—and positive youth development.

These can also be fostered by a teen’s home and community.

Preventing Dating Violence Dating violence can happen to any teen regardless of gender, race, socio-economic status, or whether or not they have experience with dating.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 in 4 adolescents experiences verbal, physical, emotional, or sexual abuse from a dating partner each year. Dating violence includes any behavior that is used to manipulate, gain control, gain power; cause fear, or make a dating partner feel bad about himself or herself.

Consequences of Dating Violence Young people who experience abuse are more likely to be in fights or bring weapons to school, have higher rates of drug and alcohol abuse, and engage in high-risk sexual behaviors.

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